Bar Show Pt1: Ice dyeing

Another bloody hiatus. Admittedly, being this busy is a good problem to have, but I still feel awful going this long between posts. I’ve made it through the two major deadlines for this month, so hopefully I can get back into the groove of 2 – 3 posts a week.

So what has happened in the last week that’s kept me from my blog? Well, the voting has begun for the ‘Party Like a Rock Star’ finals. If you’re interested in supporting, you can check out the sticky post that’s on the home page, or go here to my Facebook event page. This next stage is based on how many ‘likes’ I can muster for my submission. If you have a free moment to like a gallery, I’d greatly appreciate it if you liked mine 🙂

What I was primarily occupied with was making new stock for the Bar Show I sold at on Saturday. I went into detail about Bar Shows in a previous post for curious parties. I had a few pieces still from the last show I’d done – some fascinators, silhouette necklaces and Freddy Kreuger scarves. I knew I wanted to beef up my table stock, and opted for some more women’s accessories that were a new for Scene Ripper. I opted for ice dyeing scarves and hand painting shoes.

I’d tried ice dyeing once before for personal projects (see also Christmas gifts). On my first go of it, I just worked with cotton. It came out well enough, but ended up looking more like tie dye with blurred blotches of color, not the crisp striations that this method is known to create. For this reason, I ponied up the cash for a few yards of silk/rayon blend from Dharma Trading. Oh my gosh, you guys. The balance of weight and flow in this fabric is stunning. I know there’s a future garment project that I will have to revisit this fabric for. And as an added bonus, because I was a first time customer with Dharma, they threw in a free habotai (China silk) scarf!

Before I throw up some process photos, here’s a crash coarse on ice dyeing. It’s relatively simple, you just get more random results than tie dyeing, and therefore it can be riskier. You start with a frame with some sort of screen that you can fit your fabric on. Place the fabric on the screen, and then load enough ice to cover the surface of your fabric. You can only use powdered fabric dye for this – liquid will not work. Once you’ve chosen the colors, sprinkle on the dye. And then you’re done! Come back in about 24 hours (enough time for the ice to melt and the dye to take). Enjoy my picture of what this basically looks like:

This is what it looks like in real life:

Fabric on the screens, ready for ice

Fabric on the screens, ready for ice

Ice is added, and dye sprinkled

Ice is added, and dye sprinkled

Bit of a close up

Bit of a close up

After the 24 hours, you rinse and wash your fabric to get rid of excess dye and seal it into the fibers.

See below for the results of this batch.

These ones look a bit more tie dyed than the others

These ones look a bit more tie dyed than the others

I think this collection is my fav. The blue one on the left is the China silk. LOVE how this one came out.

I think this collection is my fav. The blue one on the left is the China silk. LOVE how this one came out.

This process is unique from tie dyeing because the dye pigments are broken apart by the melting ice by the time they reach the fabric.  This creates the striations I was talking about earlier. You can definitely see that in the blue and dark green scarves in the second photo. I still have a few of these left from the Bar Show, so look forward to them being posted on my store. I will have a post up in the next few days with links to the new item listings.

I had every intention of writing about the shoes I made for the Show, but it’s 11pm, and I have to cook for the rest of the week. Tune in tomorrow for the exciting conclusion of my Bar Show Chronicles.

Project music: “Aenima” by Tool

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